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The Social Security Appeal Process and Filing a Request For Reconsideration

CaveyLaw.com > Tampa Social Security Disability Lawyer > The Social Security Appeal Process and Filing a Request For Reconsideration

Over 66% of Initial Social Security Disability applications are denied. Don’t walk away from valuable monthly income and lifetime medical care just because you were denied. Most people are denied! It’s time to stand up for your rights and file a Request For Reconsideration. Get answers to these questions:

1. Why Was My Initial Social Security Disability Claim Denied?

Learn about the 16 different reasons your Initial Social Security Disability Application was denied and what you need to do next.

2. How Long Do I Have To File A Request For Reconsideration?

Don’t delay. Waiting more than 60 days after the date of the denial to file a Request for Reconsideration can cost you time, money and even disqualify you for benefits.

3. How Do I File My Request For Reconsideration?

You can file your Request For Reconsideration three ways. Learn which way is right for you.

4. What Information Do I Need to File A Request For Reconsideration?

More paperwork. It isn’t as much as you think, but picking the wrong family member or friend to provide the Social Security Administration with information can haunt you.

5. How Long Does It Take To Get A Decision On the Request For Reconsideration?

Learn how long it will take to get a decision, and what you should and should not do while waiting.

6. What Benefits Do I Get?

It’s hard to put a price on the lifetime Social Security disability benefits and medical care you are entitled to. Everyone’s situation is different. But as of 2010, an advocacy group that has worked for older Americans for more than three decades — The National Committee to Preserve Social Security & Medicare — estimated that the Social Security disability protection for a young disabled worker with a spouse and two children was more than $465,000.

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